Wisconsin National Guard troops welcomed home in Hartford

CREATED Sep. 11, 2012 - UPDATED: Sep. 11, 2012

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  • Annie Scholz reports Video by tmj4.com

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  • Governor Walker addressed the troops at a soldier ceremony in Hartford Image by Annie Scholz

  • Troops from the 82nd Agribusiness Development Team of the Wisconsin National Guard Image by Annie Scholz

  • The team was deployed from Hartford to Afghanistan in March to fight the opium trade and teach farmers to make money raising other crops. But today, their job is to be sisters, fathers, and friends. Image by Annie Scholz

  • TODAY'S TMJ4's Annie Scholz reports there were a lot of kisses, hugs, and tears of joy. Image by Annie Scholz

  • The troops get to spend some much needed time with their families. They're expected to report back to their units in the next 30 to 90 days. Image by Annie Scholz

  • The Wisconsin National Guard troop performed over 100 combat missions in 6 months away from home. Now they get to spend the next month to three months with family and friends. Image by Annie Scholz

HARTFORD- On September 11, we honor the victims and the men and women serving our country.

Some of those troops are now back home with their families.

100 combat missions in 6 months away from home -- the men and women of the 82nd Agribusiness Development Team of the Wisconsin National Guard did their country proud.

And what better way to celebrate than with their loved ones they missed all along.

Margaret Maslowski and her family couldn't wait to see Margaret niece, Specialist Kimberly Flock.

"We've been praying for her everyday and thinking about her everyday and just counting every day until she's home with us," said Maslowski.

Samantha Laska's brother is also part of the 2nd Agribusiness Development Team, and she's had to say goodbye to him before.

"It gets harder every time," said Laska.

The team was deployed from Hartford to Afghanistan in March to fight the opium trade and teach farmers to make money raising other crops.

But now, their job is to be sisters, fathers, and friends.  One by one, the reservists stepped off the bus into the anxious arms of loved ones.

"It was long and an experience.  I don't know how to describe it in a couple of words, but it's good to be back," explained Specialist Flock.

TODAY'S TMJ4's Annie Scholz reports there were a lot of kisses, hugs, and tears of joy on a day that has meant so many tears of sadness for years.

"It's definitely a proud day to be back, it's a day we won't forget for many reasons," said Specialist Flock.

Now they get to spend some much needed time with their families.

They're expected to report back to their units in the next 30 to 90 days.  In the meantime, they'll focus on getting back to civilian life.